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Dental Cosmetic Center Blog

We Make Teeth Sexy!

May 1, 2014

Filed under: Uncategorized — drhackbarth @ 3:22 pm

Your teeth are one of the first things people notice when they look at your face. They also help create the framework of the face, and changes can help lengthen and fill out the lower portion of the face.
We can help you achieve a more beautiful appearance with the many options available in dental treatment. We will be glad to have a free consultation with you to see what options would give you the smile you have always wanted.

Mother’s Day

Filed under: Uncategorized — drhackbarth @ 3:16 pm

We can create a personalized dental services gift certificate for that special mom in your life. Give us a call and let us work out something special to give this Mother’s Day. When your mom comes in for her appointment we will treat her like a queen, give her a cup of gourmet coffee or glass of wine, and treat her to a paraffin hand treatment. It’s just part of our way of giving her that special spa type service while getting a beautiful, healthy smile!
Mother’s Day is just a week away, so call soon! 409-935-2111

Do you eat a lot of sugar?

May 13, 2013

Filed under: General Dentistry — drhackbarth @ 10:41 pm

Check this out.

http://www.yesmagazine.org/for-teachers/curriculum/curriculum-resources-sugar-consumption-infographic?utm_source=ednews_octnov12&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=SweetToothInfographic

Conservative treatment of a tooth is best

February 26, 2013

Filed under: Uncategorized — drhackbarth @ 5:02 pm

Anytime one is considering treatment, it means that preventative care has fallen short of its goal to prevent disease or trauma.  Most times  conservative treatment options are the best.  That means we want to do whatever treatment maintains the most tooth structure but still provides strength and support for the tooth.

You have to find and handle problems when they are small.  A tiny filling is less expensive and more durable that a larger one, but we can only do micro dentistry if we see someone often enough to intervene in a timely manner.

Regular visits and exams are critical in keeping treatment minimal.

Early preventative care will save thousands

February 16, 2013

Filed under: Uncategorized — drhackbarth @ 12:26 am

Delta Dental recently looked at the lifetime cost of a filling.  What they found was shocking, to say the least.  Once a molar tooth receives its first filling,  the lifetime cost for refilling that tooth is an average of $2187.  WOW!  fillings wear out and must be replaced numerous times for most people, but $2000+?

Maybe its is better for parents to seek early preventative care for their children so that the first filling can be avoided.  Timely preventative care and proper sealants can save a fortune over a lifetime.

John Hackbarth, DDS

Can gum disease lead to erictile dysfunction?

Filed under: Dental Hygiene,Periodontics — drhackbarth @ 12:18 am
Gum Disease Linked To Erectile Dysfuntion

Posted: 06 Nov 2011 05:26 AM PST

 

Erectile Dysfunction

Gum disease may have an impact on the ability to achieve an erection, the British Dental Health Foundation has reported.  The independent charity based its report on the latest research published in the Journal of Periodontology and suggests that the cause of erectile dysfunction could be oral bacteria passing into the bloodstream.

A research team in India carried out the study on 70 male subjects with a mean age of 35, all of whom had been diagnosed with erectile dysfunction. The tests found a correlation between gum disease and the ability to achieve an erection. The data demonstrated that as the prevalence of chronic periodontitis increased, so did the severity of erectile dysfunction.

More than four out of five men (81.8 per cent) with severe erectile dysfunction had gum disease. In comparison, in cases of mild erectile dysfunction, the incidence of gum disease was less than two in five men.

According to the National Institutes of Health, erectile dysfunction is a condition that affects one in ten men worldwide, and is more commonly experienced after the age of 40.  Chief Executive of the British Dental Health Foundation Dr Nigel Carter believes that the stigma attached to the condition could be forcing men throughout the country to turn a blind eye to their oral health.

“To associate gum disease, the major preventable cause of tooth loss in adults, with such a taboo subject amongst males is not something that should be taken lightly,” Carter said. “If, in theory, four out of five men who suffer from erectile dysfunction have poor oral health, the effect it could have on their general health poses a serious health risk to those individuals affected.”

According to Carter, it is well known that gum disease has been linked to many conditions in the past that could have a detrimental effect on general health, such as heart disease and diabetes. When people have gum disease, bacteria from the mouth may enter their bloodstream; therefore, it should come as no surprise that this piece of research has linked vascular erectile dysfunction, another cardiac-related condition, with gum disease.

State of the County & Cities Luncheon

February 15, 2013

Filed under: Uncategorized — drhackbarth @ 7:04 pm

image

Our team is attending a luncheon today to listen to Judge Mark Henry talk about the state of Galveston County, Mayor Matt Doyle talk about the growth in Texas City, and Mayor Bobby Hocking talk about the growth in LaMarque. The luncheon was provided by the Texas City- LaMarque Chamber of Commerce, and was held at the Showboat Pavilion in Texas City.

International Association of Ozone in Healthcare and Dentistry

February 14, 2013

Filed under: Ozone Therapy — drhackbarth @ 6:16 pm

Dr. Hackbarth was recognized as one of the founding members of the International Association of Ozone in Healthcare and Dentistry during the IAOHD Congress, Las Vegas 2013. Congratulations Dr. Hackbarth, for always being on the cutting edge in medicine and dentistry!

http://www.texasdentalhealth.com

Founding Member IAOHD

November 22, 2011

Filed under: Uncategorized — drhackbarth @ 9:36 pm
Gum Disease Linked To Erectile Dysfuntion

Posted: 06 Nov 2011 05:26 AM PST

 

Erectile Dysfunction

Gum disease may have an impact on the ability to achieve an erection, the British Dental Health Foundation has reported.  The independent charity based its report on the latest research published in the Journal of Periodontology and suggests that the cause of erectile dysfunction could be oral bacteria passing into the bloodstream.

A research team in India carried out the study on 70 male subjects with a mean age of 35, all of whom had been diagnosed with erectile dysfunction. The tests found a correlation between gum disease and the ability to achieve an erection. The data demonstrated that as the prevalence of chronic periodontitis increased, so did the severity of erectile dysfunction.

More than four out of five men (81.8 per cent) with severe erectile dysfunction had gum disease. In comparison, in cases of mild erectile dysfunction, the incidence of gum disease was less than two in five men.

According to the National Institutes of Health, erectile dysfunction is a condition that affects one in ten men worldwide, and is more commonly experienced after the age of 40.  Chief Executive of the British Dental Health Foundation Dr Nigel Carter believes that the stigma attached to the condition could be forcing men throughout the country to turn a blind eye to their oral health.

“To associate gum disease, the major preventable cause of tooth loss in adults, with such a taboo subject amongst males is not something that should be taken lightly,” Carter said. “If, in theory, four out of five men who suffer from erectile dysfunction have poor oral health, the effect it could have on their general health poses a serious health risk to those individuals affected.”

According to Carter, it is well known that gum disease has been linked to many conditions in the past that could have a detrimental effect on general health, such as heart disease and diabetes. When people have gum disease, bacteria from the mouth may enter their bloodstream; therefore, it should come as no surprise that this piece of research has linked vascular erectile dysfunction, another cardiac-related condition, with gum disease.

Filed under: Sedation Dentistry — drhackbarth @ 9:35 pm

Are There Any Positive Reasons To Use Toothpaste?

Posted: 16 Nov 2011 05:37 PM PST

 

Toothpaste

It is true that plaque can be removed without the use of toothpaste, and especially when having a demonstration of oral hygiene techniques. It’s a lot easier to see what’s going on when your mouth is not foaming!

However there are many good reasons for using toothpaste which don’t only depend on bacterial plaque removal, but also for a variety of others as well. For example, there are anti-cavity toothpastes, extra-whitening toothpastes, toothpastes with mouthwash, and toothpastes for sensitive teeth, toothpastes with stripes, clear toothpaste, and even liver flavored toothpaste for dogs.

All toothpastes contain the following ingredients: binders, abrasives, sudsers, humectants (a substance that retains moisture), flavoring, sweeteners, fluorides, tooth whiteners, preservatives, and water. Toothpaste comes in a variety of flavors, most often being some variation of mint spearmint, peppermint, regular mint and many others.

Fluoride was first added to toothpastes in 1914; in fact fluoride toothpastes developed in the 1950s very early on received the American Dental Association’s (ADA) approval.

Probably the most researched of any toothpaste components is fluoride, which has scientifically proven anti-caries properties; it increases the resistance of teeth to demineralization — acid dissolution, and better yet also remineralizes teeth replacing calcium and reversing very early decay. Fluoride was first added to toothpastes in 1914; in fact fluoride toothpastes developed in the 1950s very early on received the American Dental Association’s (ADA) approval.

One toothpaste brand has recently added triclosan, a widely used antibacterial, in hopes of helping to reduce plaque. Other items added to toothpaste are to whiten, remove stain, polish, desensitize, bubble and the list goes on.

Important Features and Ingredients of Toothpastes

Fluoride: You should only buy toothpastes that contain fluoride. On the label, this may be called stannous fluoride, sodium fluoride or monofluoride phosphate (MFP). This is the most widely researched and agreed upon basis for using commercial toothpastes. As long as the product has fluoride, it will help maintain dental health, reduce decay and help with sensitivity.

Desensitizing Toothpastes: These work for mild cases of tooth hypersensitivity, but may take weeks to be effective. The ADA recognizes two effective ingredients in treating sensitive teeth and gums: strontium chloride and potassium nitrate, although studies are more equivocal. These block the tube-like channels of the dentine, thereby reducing the ability of the nerves to transmit pain. They are meant for sensitivity caused by receding gums, not other causes like decay.

Tartar Control: The active tartar-control ingredient, tetrasodium pyrophosphate, has been shown to prevent tartar, but it can’t remove tartar already on the teeth, which requires professional removal by a hygienist or dentist. Some people have reported mouth irritation, and do not do enough extra to warrant this risk.

Baking Soda: There is actually no proof that this has any effect at all. Baking soda may be too abrasive for continual use, and may actually lead to gum problems and irritation in the mouth. Some people, however, like the taste and feel of baking soda in the mouth.

Any toothpaste with the ADA seal has been proven safe and effective.

Peroxide: While the ADA believes current levels of peroxide in toothpastes are safe, some studies report that peroxide in high concentrations can irritate and damage gum tissue. The bubbling may make you feel like you’re getting a better cleaning, but there is no scientific proof of this.

Abrasives: These are essentially for helping to remove plaque, and are usually in the form of silica. All ADA-approved toothpastes contain mild abrasives.

Whitening Ability: As mentioned above, no toothpaste has been proven effective in actually changing the color of teeth. The whitening toothpastes merely clean surface stains, but cannot change the underlying tooth color.

American Dental Association (ADA) Seal of Acceptance: The ADA awards its seal only after reviewing the “appropriate clinical and/or laboratory studies and scientific data.” Any toothpaste with the ADA seal has been proven safe and effective.

So you see there are lots of good reasons to use toothpaste and many choices to allow you to find one that is right for you.

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